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lost a noble soul. dan inouye lived a long and productive life. still i speak for dan's senate family when i say we're devastated by his passing. but we will all miss him. his legacy will live in the halls of the senate and the state of hawaii as long as history is written. his place in the history books will not fade. as the second-longest serving senator in our history, senator inouye's career in congress spanned the life of hawaii's statehood, elected to the senate in 1962. only robert byrd served longer. senator inouye's tradition of service began long before he came to the united states senate. he was working as a medical volunteer when japanese warplanes attacked pearl harbor. he was just a boy, a teenager. from the time he was just a kid, he wanted to be a doctor, a medical doctor, but a different fate awaited dan inouye. after the attack, as we all know too well, japanese americans were deemed enemy aliens and were therefore not subject to the draft. in spite of that, in spite of the humiliation, more than 110,000 people of japanese ancestry were imprisoned in american internm
over the course of a long career. but mr. president, what i want to focus on for a minute is the dan inouye who has been there for me as a friend and mentor for the past 20 years. who has been a shining light in this chamber. senator inouye was not the loudest member of this chamber, he was not the most robust and he wasn't a senator who spent his time making long winded speeches but through his quiet resolve, his under stated strength and his commitment to do the right thing no matter what he was able to accomplish so much. he led the appropriations committee through difficult times with grace and incredible effectiveness. the partisan rank that too oftendom nates this city was unaccept to believe him. his focus was on people, on the infrastructure they depend on in the communities, on the must vulnerable. he was a giant here in the senate, he was a mountain back home. hawaii would not be hawaii without dan inouye. he fought for his state. he would not allow it to be ignored and he made it a better place to live and work for generations to come. mr. president, as a senator from anot
. we pray in your sovereign name. amen. >> senator dan inouye was a noble soul, one of the finest men i have ever met, and we are por for his loss. i want to join senator inouye's family, hawaii, and all americans in paying respect to an american hero. senator inouye was one of the deluxe senators to ever walk the hallowed halls of this great building. he leaves behind a legacy of public leadership and private kindness that will not be forgotten as long as these walls stand and as long as histories are written. it is fitting you should lie in state in the dome of the capital and proper that he should rest upon the same platform upon which abraham lincoln, president john f. kennedy, rosa parks, and 26 more of this nation's luminaries have lain in state. dan inouye was an institution and deserves to spend at least another day in this beautiful building in which he dedicated his life. as the second longest-serving senator in our history, dan inouye represented our 50th state from the first day it was entered into the union, but his traditional service began long before he came to the unite
campaign and the influence on the electoral college with brendan doherty. later, dan friedman has an update on the hurricane sandy relief bill making its way through congress. "washington journal" is next. >> nobody will get 100% of what they want. let's make sure middle-class families and the american economy and the world economy are not adversely impacted because people cannot do their jobs. host: the headline in this morning's "washington post" -- president obama and senate leaders were on the verge of an agreement that would let taxes rise on the wealthiest households while protecting the vast majority of americans from tax hikes set to hit in january. welcome to the saturday edition of "and the washington journal." for the first 45 minutes of the program we are going to be talking about senate negotiating a fiscal clifts deal, what has been going on on that half of the capital. see what they are talking about and how things are going. we want to get your input and your part of the conversation. you can reach out to us on twitter. facebook, facebook.com/cspan. and you can sen
we got an update on the hurricane sandy relief funding legislation. >> dan friedman is a correspondent with the new york daily news. he is here to talk about the bill that passed yesterday. the senate passing an aid package. it took a 0.5 weeks. what is in that package? what is not enough package? >> the biggest item is about $17 billion. there's about 12 billion ford transit repair. people who live in flood areas could get their damages covered. those are probably the biggest. >>host: there were some items folks tried to tack on, and then it's not necessarily related to hurricane sandy. guest: in the bill that passed, it includes $150 million for fisheries repair available to people in alaska, mississippi, and new england. there is money to repair and marine debris floating across to alaska from the tsunami. there are various bits of funding that goes to other parts of the country. there's $3 billion, some of which will be available to hurricane isaac victims. host: in your article, you talk about the next step. the house returns sunday for a possible vote on the fi
, thank you very much. [applause] >> next, and to raise with to retiring members of congress. dan burton of indiana talks about his 30 years in congress. followed by senator kent conrad on his 26-year career. and a discussion on corporations and stock values. dan burton is retiring from the house this year after 30 years in office. the 15-term congressman represents the fifth district in east central indiana which includes parts of indianapolis and the surrounding suburbs. earlier he talked with c-span about his past investigations of the collective demonstration and the oversight ruled congress. this is 30 minutes. as you exit the institution how would you say it stated? >> it has changed a great deal. it is not the same as when i came 1983. there seemed to be more comedy. tip o'neill was speaker. i will never forget he was the first time he was on the floor raising cane with democrats. he had someone take his place and he came down and started giving me the dickens. after that we became very good friends and played golf together. michael was a wonderful leader. there was a spirit of ca
-called fiscal cliff with role call columnist dan collender and joshua gordon. and then we're joined by the authors of "the end of the line." romney versus obama and the 34 days that decided the election. our guest are senior white house report glenn thrush and jonathan martin. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. >> if you worked for him you'd get a mercurial, sometimes generous, sometimes overbearing, sometimes almost cruel boss, who didn't know how to apologize. which men of his age and class
and senate. dan burton on his 30 year career. and kent conrad on his 26 year career. in 45 minutes, a discussion of the coming years'housing market . .
of congress. dan burton and kent conrad. a little snippet from each interview. we will show you now congressman burton. [video clip] >> i would like for people to think, he might have been a bulldog, but he was a man who believed in honesty and integrity of things that were right for this country. regardless of how difficult it was, he kept to those principles. i hope they will look at me like that. i know a lot of people think i am a bad guy and a goofy things, i hope they think i am a man of integrity. host: that will be tonight at 8:00 followed by kent conrad after that. about a half-hour interview with each of them. we will continue to play that thereof the week. here is a headline from "the washington times." much from ohio. good morning. caller: i am positive and helpful -- i am looking for 2013 to be a good year. i retired at the selfridge -- self-employed. i am hoping the if it will be a good year. host: what are you hearing or seeing that makes you more optimistic that some of our other callers? caller: a desire to feel positive. i retired last spring. i am just hoping the
. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> dan burton is retiring from congress. he talked with c-span about his past investigations of the clinton investigation and the oversight role of congress. this is 30 minutes. >> how would you say the state is? >> it has changed a great deal. it is not the same as when i came 1983. there seemed to be more comedy. tip o'neill was speaker. i will never forget he was the first time he was on the floor raising cane with democrats. and he came down and started giving me the dickens. after that we became very good friends and played golf together. bob michael was a wonderful leader. there was a spirit of camaraderie even though we had differences politically then that we do not have now. now it is much more combative. i have a lot of friends on the democratic side of the aisle, very good friends. as far as working things out is not as easy as it used to be. >> what are some of the root causes? >> i think and i am not pointing fingers, when we went after jim wright, newt was the speaker and jim was forced out of office. they wen
. and with him and i'll ask the panel to come forward. howard gor dan and michael sheen. >> figs of all, thank you for being here this evening and thank you for being here on a friday night. i don't do this for a live sog you're going to have to fill in in the middle. let's start off shes we all know the wonderful shows and movies you've been involved with, many of which have overlapped with politics from "homeland," "the queen", so the first thing i'd like to ask -- i'd like to talk about the shows "homeland" and "the queen." where did those come from in the first place? >> "24" came from a basic idea, two writers. joel said it was an in the shower idea. i'm thinking about television and in television there are 22 or 24 episodes in a season, thinking about the number 24 and said could you do an entire series of television over the course of one day. and i was an executive at fox at the time and when he came in and said this to me and that was an intriguing notion could you do an entire series of television over one day real time. then he laid out the bearest pones of a story that would suppor
much. the >> tonight, interviews with retiring members of congress. first, dan burton has been a member of the u.s. house for 30 years. and then north dakota democrat kent conrad that is leaving the senate after five terms. we spoke with them about how things have changed on capitol hill since they were elected. and join us tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. on tomorrow morning's washington journal, we ask business owners to call and and ask about the fiscal cliff. and we talked to the chief economist, lawrence yun. and discussions about the fiscal cliff negotiations as congress returns to washington. and later, a discussion on background checks, how they work, and when they are required. washington journal is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. columnist in a news analyst talks about the relationship with religion and american politics. he was introduced by the former missouri senator and ambassador to the united nations and john danforth. from washington university, this is an hour-and-a-half. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr.
. when i was back in d.c., we had dan and bob and they sat in an irish bar around the corner and worked out the tax bill in 1987, i believe the year was. that's the kind of leadership the article was just talking about. instead of the people that call up and paris at the propaganda, we really have to be practical. -- that parrot the propaganda. a house divided cannot stand. let me give my personal example. i live on $6.66 a day. that is food stamps. that is for single adults. i live on social security, $774 a month. i am trying to go back to cornell to do sustainable energy. we are in a double down on reaganomics in despite. jimmy carter had great inflation because for five years we were a peaceful country again. then reagan put us back into the largest military buildup in peacetime. i think that's what we ought to do is realize that did not work, just like some of the new deal stuff was not working correctly. what we have to do is c- span.org [indiscernible] i want to thank mr. richard delver of the department of transportation, because unlike michael bloomberg -- host: you have gone a
by dan faymann. live at seven easton on c-span. >> next, an engineer and entrepreneur in the aerospace community, contrasts today's space program to the pioneering days of space -- space exploration days ago and talked about the history of manned space flight. he designed spaceship one that completed the first manned private space flight in 2004. the voyager aircraft in 1986 became the first airplane to fly nonstop around the world without refueling. this is about an hour and a half. >> i am going to talk about meanly two things. there is inspiration. inspiration for our kids so they can be innovative. and i am going to talk a lot about manned space flight. we are on the space coast, i guess, right? we will talk quite a bit about the history of manned space flight. pretty much that. i really welcome your questions when i am done. my first job out of college was a government job. i worked for the air force. flight testing airplanes during the vietnam war. i did that for seven years. it was a wonderful thing for future airplane designer to do, and that is test brand new airplanes on thei
this university, this center and crucial to the dan forget family. thank you and thank them for you're attention and now i welcome your comments. i thank you very much. >> we are having time for q&a. we have standing mikes if you will queue at the mikes we will take your turn and we will end promptly at 8:30 which gives us about 20 minutes. >> i appear to have answered every question. >> thanks for coming. what would you see -- one of the arguments for less government involvement with things is that if people hold on to their money more, they would be in a position to take care of the poor, the oh pressed etc. can you imagine where else that might come from? do you think it's possible for those people to be taken care of outside of a religious context and outside of a political context and are there any examples of that in other government? >> i am not denying the role which americans of all political persuasions now agree on that the state has in applying a social safety net. i am saying there are potential cost to this and not only financial cost. there is a cost of a crowding out of private i
-term compromise. dan on the phone from massachusetts. caller: thank you for taking my call. i would like to know how many millionaires there are in this country versus the number of people who make $250,000 and less. i think that's where the argument can bw won e won. john boehner is making a calculation and i think that is a poor population. we should roll back the reagan tax cuts. tax cuts do not work. the bush tax cuts have been designed to be temporary. we have had no job growth due to the tax cuts. forbusinesses on the hook reinvesting their profits back into the businesses. thank you for taking my call. host: the story from "the washington times." host: other candidates that have been mentioned include the attorney general in massachusetts. he ran against scott brown and loss. congressman stephen lynch. name out of contention is ted kennedy, jr. he will not seek the seat. he was speculated to seek the seat of his late father. the decision to buck the dying inouye. senator daniel in a the swearing-in took place yesterday with joe biden. brian schatz becomes the senior senator with the new c
. 2012] >> tomorrow night, and interviews with two and outgoing members of congress, dan burton talks about his 30 years in the house of representatives and kent conrad on his five terms in office. you can see both of those interviews on c-span beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern. >> as president obama begins his second term, what is the most important issue he should consider? >> if you are in grades 6 through 12, make a video to be president. >> your chance to win the grand prize of $5,000, $50,000 in prizes. the deadline is january 8. >> this year, arnold palmer was awarded the congressional gold medal at a ceremony in his honor. leaders and fellow golfer jack nicklaus talked about his contributions to the sport and his philanthropic work. from september, this ceremony is an hour 15 minutes. >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome our honored guest, not members of the united states house of representatives, members of the united states senate, and the speaker of the united states house of representatives. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, the honorable john boehner. [applause] >> ladies
in the seat, i inherited from dan inouye. when i looked at that, i was overcome with emotion. i did not speak. i realize i am delayed by a couple of minutes here, but i think of my friend and i think of his name. he said he wanted to be remembered as having represented his people to the best of his ability. he fill that out. -- filled that out. we know he gave everything to the senate. mr. president, i yield the floor. >> the senior senator from vermont and will present himself at the desk. senator leahy will be escorted to the desk. the vice president will be escorted to the desk. i am going to read the oath to you. let me stand here. do you solemnly swear that will support and defend the constitution of united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you bear true faith, that you take this oath and obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of invasion, and that will will faithfully discharge the duties of the office of are about to enter, so help you god? >> i do. [applause] >> majority leader? >> senate resolution 622, notifying the house of residents of th
: let's get another call in from dan in massachusetts on our line for independents. you're on the "washington journal." go ahead. caller: good morning. my point is i looked into this just a little bit because my curiosity had me. because how can a human being do something like this? and it turns out your point you were making earlier, in most of these instances these kids do have some type of mental problems be it depression or whatever. but it's from what i could see the majority of them are on prescription drugs. and these drugs, it says right on them that your chances of commiting suicide have increased 20 fold by taking this drug. so the connection between the prescription drug epidemic we have in our country and how it links to this is fascinating. and another point i want to make, in a bigger picture our nation, our country. the people here we've been losing our rights for ten years. they've been getting flushed down the toilet. and we haven't felt the repercusions from this at home. but certainly the writing should be on the wall based on what's happening that thi
, we'll bring your interviews with two retiring members of congress. first, dan burton. then, kent conrad who is leaving the senate after five terms. we spoke to both men about their careers. join us tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. >> as president obama begins his second term in office, what is the most important issue he should consider? >> tell us then they make a short video about your message to the president. >> your chance to win a grand prize of $5,000. $50,000 in total prices. for more information, go to studentcam.org. >> next, kent conrad talks about fiscal cliff negotiations and proposals for a long term deficit reduction. he will be retiring this year after serving in the u.s. senate since 1987. this is about an hour. >> good morning. good to see you all. another day of fiscal cliff or fiscal curve, whatever one wants to term it. what we do know is the law is about to change, all the tax cuts from the bush era are about to expire. across the board spending cuts, some $1.2 trillion over the next ten years. so these are significant changes in law about to occ
hills. many homes are scattered in the midwest. host: our first call for lawrence yun comes from dan in virginia beach, virginia. caller: i'm interested in this topic, especially being under water, but not terribly under water. some time ago, the president suggested that all the banks or lenders should forgive the difference between where the market is and what they borrowed. i thought, there's not one bank on earth that will do that. here's an idea. i pay $135 a month in my payment for private mortgage insurance. since i have had this home loan, it's over $6,000 that has gone through this private mortgage insurance. i thought, if the president wants to do something for me, why not get rid of that. that would lower my payment or increase my payment and that would be a better way to move the housing market forward. i am interested in any comment on that matter. guest: the first think most people would agree on is that market interest rates is 3.5%. to match up the market interest rate will save about $250 per month. a second part is the housing market recovery. we have seen two millio
heard about in congress. we will be joined by dan friedman. "washington journal" alive at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> as president obama begins his second term in office, what is most important issue he should consider for 2013? >> make a short video about your message. >> it is the student can video competition with your chance to win the grand prize of $5,000. 50,000 total prices. that deadline is january 8th. for more information, go to studentcam.org. >> retired general norman schwarzkopf, commander of forces in desert shield and desert storm died. he commanded a u.s.-led coalition which drove forces under saddam hussein out of kuwait. george is to be bush said that the general epitomized the to become a service, a country creed that has defended the country's freedom and the defense secretary described the four-star army general as one of the great military giants of the 20 century. next, an interview with the retired general on his autobiography. >> general norman schwarzkopf author of "it doesn't take a hero." "almost every soldier in -- almost every general in desert
the speech this said, if you love us so much, why do you still have all those guns pointed towards us. dan and i were way back away from them. there was a real between us. they cannot hear what i said to him. i said, tell the s.o.b. i don't trust him. he said they would run both of us out there. his son is a very fine young man, did a wonderful job as vice chairman of this committee. we will miss the young man. how do you lose a guy like jeff cravaack? very knowledgeable, fought for everything that was right. he served with me on -- i believe we served together on the transportation committee. is lynn here yet? she is not here. brad miller of north carolina. i have learned something from him, several things. he goes back to one of the better law practices in north carolina. all my folks from cannon mills, kannapolis. you are done enough to come back. i wish you well. -- young enough to come back. i wish you well. and hansen clarke. he was a great guy. it was an honor to serve on this committee with all of you. no matter what they go to next, there will always be friends and colleagues. mis
public editor, dan. he was pretty critical. i didn't all the agree with him and he had his kind of quirks like everybody else does and he couldn't stand klugman who i think is quiet good. and then gentle barney very rarely raised his voice so they liked him. and i was pretty -- kind of critical of him. he's a very nice man but didn't push them. then the next person was craig whoy thought was quite good. then they had author who didn't finish his term and didn't have much to say. but i think really what we need in the public editor frankly, and i have said this in print, not in the book, but they need kind of a somewhat trance gressive feistty public editor who calls them to account. for example, their financial reports, i've talked about that, are often semibog gus. they are on the mystic and were issuing reports that weren't true. if they issue reports ten years in a row that are overly optimistic somebody should call them on this. they just write stories about themselves. but i think we could have a little bit of a -- they should be called to account on lots of things. they should be ca
by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journalists, they wrote books. >> they are in many cases more interesting as human beings than their husbands. if only because they are not first and foremost defined and limited by political ambition. >> dolly was socially adept at politically savvy. >> dollar madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe he did it. >> they cannot rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during the statement, you w
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25